Thomas M. Grogan, MD

Ventana Medical Systems, Inc.,
a member of the Roche Group | Founder Emeritus
University of Arizona | Professor Emeritus of Pathology

 

Thomas M. Grogan is an accomplished life sciences leader with more than four decades of experience as a clinical pathologist and executive manager. He is the Founder (Emeritus) of Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., a world leader and innovator of tissue-based diagnostic solutions for patients worldwide, and Professor Emeritus of Pathology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He also serves as a mentor and scientific advisor to Ventana and Roche Tissue Diagnostics’ team of researchers.

Grogan began his career in pathology shortly after receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Biology from the University of Virginia. Following his graduation, he worked alongside Dr. Chapman Binford, a renowned scientist at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, on a leprosy research study funded by the National Institutes of Health.  Under Binford’s tutelage, Grogan was introduced to pathology and inspired to pursue a Doctor of Medicine from George Washington University. Upon receiving his medical degree in 1971, Grogan became a pathology resident at Letterman Army Medical Center, followed by Chief of the Hematology lab at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He later went on to complete a post-doctoral fellowship in hematopathology at Stanford University at the recommendation of Dr. Costan Berard, a key figure in American hematopathology.

Grogan joined the faculty at the University of Arizona in 1979, and since then has been actively involved in teaching residents, medical students and fellows. A few years later in 1985, Grogan and a small team of highly skilled doctors, scientists, and engineers formed Ventana Medical Systems. Grogan and his colleagues pioneered automated and standardized tissue biopsy testing to deliver diagnostic results to patients more swiftly and with greater accuracy and reliability. Since being acquired by Roche in 2008, Ventana has grown to be the world’s leading developer and manufacturer of tissue-based diagnostic instruments and tests focused on the detection and treatment of cancer.

Grogan is also a founding member of the International Lymphoma Study Group, a group of scientific leaders responsible for formulating the current World Health Organization classification scheme for clinical practice.  He has authored more than 250 papers on lymphoma and myeloma, and holds patents for the kinetic-mode process for automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH).